MAR
20-25
2016

Category: Nevada
Trip Report #: 212
Partners: James Huang (all climbs) / 
Maia Baegent (Climb 6) / 
Nick Weicht (Climbs 7 & 8)
Rock Type: Aztec Sandstone
Elev: 4,000-6,000 ft
RED ROCKS Spring Break 2016
Climb 1: Black Orpheus (5.9+/10a, 8-11p, 1370')
Climb 2: Wholesome Fullback (5.10a, 2-3p, 230')
Climb 3: Our Father (5.10d, 3p, 240')
Climb 4: Frigid Air Buttress (5.9+, 7-10p, 940')
Climb 5: Eagle Dance (5.10c A0, 9p, 900')
Climb 6: Tunnel Vision (5.7+, 6p, 750')
 Climb 7: Ixtlan (5.11c, 4-8p, 665')
Climb 8: The Gobbler (5.9, 2p, 200') - Fiddler on the Roof (5.10d, first 2p: 250')

8 climbs in 6 days!
INTRO

This trip report summarizes my sixth trip to Red Rocks. I had originally planned this trip with my friend Dow Williams, but financial constraints (rental car costs, lodging costs, etc.) resulted in a last-minute scramble to figure out a cheaper way to make the trip happen, and I fell into a situation where I was staying at an airbnb for $10/night with a bunch of climbers from the MIT Outing Club and climbing with a super nice guy and solid climber named James Huang for the week. I had six days to climb and we climbed every day, climbing a total of eight awesome routes. James and I climbed together every day, but on the fifth day we were joined by his friend Maia and on the sixth day we were joined by a friend-of-a-friend Nick Weicht. Apart from the case of bad food poisoning I had the last two days of the trip which sort of put a damper on my enjoyment level, this was an awesome trip. Thanks James (and Maia and Nick)!

Routes we climbed:
Climb 1: MAR 20: Black Orpheus (5.9+/10a, 8-11 pitches, 1370') (Black Arch Wall, Oak Creek Canyon) 
Climbs 2&3MAR 21: Wholesome Fullback (5.10a, 2-3 pitches, 230') and Our Father (5.10d, 3 pitches, 240') (Whiskey Peak, Black Velvet Canyon)
Climb 4MAR 22Frigid Air Buttress (5.9+, 7-10 pitches, 940') (Frigid Air Buttress, Icebox Canyon)
Climb 5MAR 23Eagle Dance (5.10c A0, 9 pitches, 900') (Eagle Wall, Oak Creek Canyon)
Climb 6MAR 24Tunnel Vision (5.7+, 6 pitches, 750') (Angel Food Wall, White Rock Springs)
Climbs 7&8MAR 25: Ixtlan (5.11c, 4-8 pitches, 665') and The Gobbler (5.9, 2 pitches, 200') to Fiddler on the Roof (5.10d, first 2 pitches, ~250')  (Whiskey Peak and Black Velvet Wall, Black Velvet Canyon)
My favorite route from the trip? Ixtlan

PHOTOS AND OVERLAYS FROM CLIMBS

CLIMB 1 - MAR 20
 - w/ JAMES HUANG
Black Orpheus (5.9+/5.10a, 8-11 pitches, 1370')
on Black Arch Wall in Oak Creek Canyon  
Black Orpheus climbs the huge SW-facing wall on the west side of Solar Slab, culminating in a giant arcing right-facing corner that has the best climbing on the route. This route consists of over 1000 feet of enjoyable climbing—long sections of moderate climbing with a couple of sections of 5.9 and a short 10a crux—with spectacular views of Oak Creek Canyon. 
FA: Jorge & Joanne Urioste, 1979.
Route overlay:
Notes:
  • History of route From supertopo: "George and Joanne Urioste accomplished the first ascent of Black Orpheus in April 1979. It was not a good time for the Uriostes. They were divorced. Though plagued by uncertainty and facing serious life decisions, they were united by a common love for climbing. A reconnaissance up the first few pitches looked very promising. The dark, south-facing rock was warm and pleasant in the still-cool spring air. The initial pitches went free and assured easy access to the spectacular crack and dihedral system on the upper part of the route. They returned optimistically, with the intention of climbing through to the summit in one push. The climbing went well. They quickly achieved their previous high point and continued onto the upper cracks. As they reached the top of their thirteenth pitch, both daylight and crack were fading. Faced with drilling several bolts to protect the face climbing that separated them from the summit, they had no choice but to bivouac. Even then, their options were limited. There was no ledge big enough to stretch out on, only big enough for sitting. And, ironically, there was no spot big enough for them to sit together, so the maritally torn climbers endured the cold April night on separate ledges high above Oak Creek. When morning finally arrived, George set out to lead the face pitch. Tired, stiff, and debilitated from the rough night, he drilled the four protection bolts on the pink face. Above this pitch the difficulties faded and the climbers were soon unroping on the summit slabs." 
  • Origin of route nameThe route was named for the 1959 Portuguese film (Orfeu Negro), based on a Greek myth about tragic love.
(Pitches as per Handren guide) Photos: Notes:

PITCH

1
(5.8, 110')
       the first photo shows us at the base of the route with Mt. Wilson in the distance. the second photo is looking up pitch 1.

(first photo by James)

PITCH
2
(5.8+, 140')
   

PITCH
3
(5.7, 110')
   

PITCHES
4-7
(5.5, 500')
(simulclimbed)
        we simulclimbed these pitches in one long pitch.

PITCH
8
(5.9, 160')
    one of the money pitches of the route - pretty sustained jamming and a cool exit move. james and i were swinging leads so i got this pitch.

PITCH
9
(5.10a, 110')
        in the first photo, james is at the crux of the pitch, a powerful but short pull up a thin crack on a steep wall, protected by 2 bolts. the second photo shows the fun twin cracks on the remainder of the pitch.

PITCH
10
(5.8, 120')
    this pitch is rated "5.6 lieback" in the Handren guide but the Uriosite guidebook gives it 5.8. felt more like the latter to me on lead and with 1000' of climbing already under our belts...

PITCH
11
(5.6, 120')
    the face traverse of the last pitch is protected by three generously-spaced bolts...

DESCENT

(requires 3 raps with a single 70m rope)
                    the descent entails making a few rappels (a single 70m rope is fine) into painted bowl and then scrambling out towards the wash (find the "IBM Boulder" and then follow cairns from here). the last photo shows the "IBM Boulder", so named because it looks like a typeball used by the old IBM Selectric typwriters.

OTHER PHOTOS FROM THE DAY
            toe socks, the view out from Oak Creek Canyon, and looking up Eagle Wall (Eagle Dance and Levitation 29).


CLIMBS 2&3 - MAR 21 - w/ JAMES HUANG
Wholesome Fullback (5.10a, 2-3 pitches, 230')
and Our Father (5.10d, 3 pitches, 240')
on Wholesome Fullback Buttress on Whiskey Peak in Black Velvet Canyon  
On the north face of Whiskey Peak is an obvious 200' high pillar, with crack systems on either side. Wholesome Fullback climbs the crack system just left of the pillar while Our Father climbs the crack system just right of pillar. Wholesome Fullback is considered by some to have the best single pitch of 5.10a crack climbing in Red Rocks: thin finger crack right off the deck, splitter hand crack, a tricky face traverse under a small roof, a technical lieback/finger crack crux, and then seemingly endless perfect hand jams to a ledge 160 feet off the deck. Our Father is equally fantastic and a bit harder, culminating in an awesome 5.10d steep corner.
FA (Wholesome Fullback): Carl Folsom & Lars Holbek, 1975. FA (Our Father): R. Wheeler, Joe Herbst, R. Grandstaff, Vern Clevenger, 1977.
Route overlay:
(Pitches as per Handren guide) Photos: Notes:
WHOLESOME FULLBACK
PITCH

1a
(5.10a, 70')

(PITCH 1 often split into 2 pitches)
         handren has the entire route at two pitches, while mountainproject splits up the first pitch into two pitches, both of which have a 10a crux. we also split the first pitch into two pitches—i led the first while james led the second. we thought the first crux (about 15' off the ground) was a bit harder than the second crux, since the feet felt more insecure.
WHOLESOME FULLBACK
PITCH 
1b
(5.10a, 90')

(PITCH 1 often split into 2 pitches)
              the second half of pitch 1 (as per handren guide). more awesome climbing.
WHOLESOME FULLBACK
PITCH 
2
(5.7, 70')
             the last pitch starts with a wide flare (good gear though) and finishes with a narrow chimney behind the pillar to a great belay spot on the top of the pillar. there's some dropped gear at the base of the chimney, and james and i managed to squeeze our way down to collect a draw and a nut.

(last photo by James)
OUR FATHER PITCH
1
(5.7, 70')
  pitch 1 is pretty easy but still fun climbing.
OUR FATHER PITCH 
2
(5.9, 95')
     james reading the mountainproject beta for pitch 2. the first 70 feet of this pitch has only one bolt and virtually no other pro. generally trend left of the bolt, where 5.9 climbing does exist. it's a heady pitch.
OUR FATHER PITCH
3
(5.10d, 75')
       the awesome 10d corner. nice lead james! 

OTHER PHOTOS FROM THE DAY
           hiking into black velvet canyon in the morning light, ixtlan (someday i will climb this route!), and a view of wholesome fullback on the approach.


CLIMB 4 - MAR 22 - w/ JAMES HUANG
Frigid Air Buttress (5.9+, 7-10 pitches, 940'
on Frigid Air Buttress in Icebox Canyon
Frigid Air Buttress follows a line slightly left of the prow of the buttress, up a staircase of steep pitches separated by roomy belay ledges. With it's fun and varied crack climbing, good pro, and short approach, this route makes for an enjoyable day of climbing.
FA: Joe Herbst, Larry Hamilton, 1976.

Route overlay:
 
(Pitches as per Handren guide) Photos: Notes:

PITCH 

1
(5.7, 180')
                     some climbers break up the first pitch into two pitches (since there are bolted anchors at the top of the first half), but we climbed it as one, as described in the handren guide. the trickiest bit of climbing was right off the ledge above the bolted anchors. 

PITCH
2
(5.8, 160')
          james and i were swinging leads, so i led the second pitch. some climbers also break this pitch into two pitches, but we climbed it as one pitch as described in the handren guide. there were a couple of spicy moves midway up, and a cool flake traverse at the top. plus a roomy belay ledge.

PITCH
3
(5.4, 100')
                 james and i agreed that the third pitch was some of the most interesting and fun 5.4 we had climbed. this pitch ascends a curving chimney where the mountain has separated to create this feature. it ends at another nice belay ledge. this was where we met the sun which touches the buttress for a few hours is the mid-morning.

PITCH
4
(5.9, 120')
       the first half of this pitch is a nice finger-to-hand crack up a featured face. the second half is a fist-crack. i enjoy offwidths so i was happy to lead this pitch. i was able to set an #0.75 and #2 at the start of the fist-crack a then #3's worked the rest of the way (we had two #3's so I leapfrogged them a bit just to keep my protection close). i did not need our #4 or anything bigger on this pitch, although there was a 10-ft even wider section just before the fist-crack where i would have placed a #5 if i had it, but it was pretty easy climbing so i was okay running it out here.

(first photo by James)

PITCH
5
(5.9, 120')
              this pitch is rated 5.9, perhaps for the exit move out of the initial chimney which is kind of awkward and athletic. james protected the exit move with a #4 cam—this is the only real spot on the route that we felt we needed the #4 cam, and we were happy to have it. the looming slot at the top has lots of features on the outside for easy climbing.

PITCH
6
(5.4, 110')
   the first half of the pitch is fun and easy steep wacos and crack. the second half of the pitch is mostly 4th class, but covered in features that like to snag the rope (so probably best to set as little pro as possible here). you want to make it to just below the final headwall so that the next pitch brings you to the top.

PITCH
7
(5.9+, 150')
            the last pitch is up the steep varnished final headwall. it is rated 5.9+ but seemed no harder than the 5.9 pitches below. pretty good climbing!

DESCENT
                        the descent entails:
(1) scrambling down from the summit to a chimney;
(2) downclimbing or rapping the chimney (we rapped);
(3) scrambling 3rd class (well marked by cairns) to a ramp leading to a small tree on the edge of the cliff which marks the first rappell;
(4) making 4 rappels: 1. single-rope rappel from the tree, 2. double-rope rappel from a bolted station on a boulder, 3. double-rope rappel from a bolted station in the middle of the face to a ledge below, and 4. double-rope rappel from a tree on climber's left of aforementioned ledge;
(5) scrambling back to the trail, generally staying right at first to avoid boulders that cliff out;
(6) hiking about 10 more minutes on the main trail to the parking lot.

OTHER PHOTOS FROM THE DAY
    the view out of Icebox Canyon while climbing Frigid Air Buttress.


CLIMB 5 - MAR 23 - w/ JAMES HUANG
Eagle Dance (5.10c A0, 9 pitches, 900'
on Eagle Wall in Oak Creek Canyon
Eagle Dance is a superb climb on excellent rock, just a couple of hundred feet left of Levitation 29. Although not a sport route, it is heavily bolted. It is rare to find such an amenable route in such spectacular surroundings.
FA: Jorge & Joanne Urioste, 1980.

Route overlay:
Notes:
  • History of route and Origin of route name: From supertopo: "George and Joanne Urioste started work on this route in early 1980. Because of the amount of work required, the route was climbed with fixed ropes leading upward from the Urioste’s “Eagle Camp,” a level spot at the base of the route. Keeping the camp stocked was a major effort in itself, requiring many trips up the rocky streambed of Oak Creek. Joanne reports that they memorized every boulder on their numerous trips, frequently done in the dark and with no headlamps. Back in the late 1970s, the cliffs of Red Rocks were frequented by some very large soaring birds. Though there was speculation that they might have been condors (due to their impressive size), the local climbers referred to them generically as eagles. One such bird kept the Uriostes company, hovering continuously over Oak Creek and Mount Wilson to the south. As George and Joanne were working on one of the lower pitches on the route, they accidentally dropped a baby angle piton. While it was not a critical loss, no climber gives up gear without a fight, so that afternoon they scoured the brushy area at the base of the route. After searching with no result, they were about to give up. With hope waning, Joanne suggested that perhaps they should ask the eagle for guidance—and they found the piton less than a minute later! And so the route and wall were named after the charmed bird. It was only later, while studying the wall from a distance, that they noticed a peculiar patch of dark varnish high on the face. Its outline, in the shape of a westbound eagle, made the omen complete. Eagle Dance climbs through the eagle's neck."
(Pitches as per Handren guide) Photos: Notes:

APPROACH
                          we approached via the slippery slabs 3rd/4th route. we left the car at 4am and got to the base of the climb at 7am (so the approach took 3 hours). 

PITCH 

1
(5.9, 90')
                                  the first two pitches are the only pitches without bolts. they are also the two easiest pitches of the route, so they were a good warmup to the harder pitches looming above...

PITCH
2
(5.7, 120')
        the second pitch follows a slanting varnished crack, where pro is a bit sparse (nuts worked well in some spots), but the climbing is relatively easy. i reached the sun midway up the first pitch lead. it was sunny all day but the wind kept it from ever really feeling all that warm.

PITCH
3
(5.10a, 160')
   excellent sustained 5.10a face climbing on pitch 3.

PITCH
4
(5.10c, 90')
     pitch 4 is pretty sustained steep face climbing up white sandstone. although this pitch is one of the 10c crux pitches of the route, both james and i felt that pitches 8 and 9 were harder.

PITCH
5
(5.10a, 120')
  james linked pitches 5 and 6. i really enjoyed these two pitches.

PITCH
6
(5.10a, 50')
 

PITCH
7
(5.8 A0, 60')
                     the bolt ladder has 8 bolts. i led this pitch, and it went pretty smoothly using two long slings as aiders: (1) clip a draw to the next bolt, (2) clip the rope through the draw, (3) put my improvised aider on the top biner of the draw, (4) step in the aider and move my weight onto the bolt, (5) remove my other improvised aider from the previous bolt, (6) repeat.

note: one of the bolts was sticking about an inch out of the wall, but fortunately it could be supplemented with an 0.5 cam. both james and i weighted this bolt and it held, but it was a tad unnerving.

PITCH
8
(5.10b, 40')
     pitches 8 and 9 were for me the hardest pitches of the route (pitch 8 seemed just as difficult as pitch 9 despite being rated a grade lower). the sandstone is a bit rounded and soft by this point on the route, making the moves seem less secure. but still good climbing. awesome lead james.

PITCH
9
(5.10c, 100')
                   like pitch 8, the sandstone on this pitch is a bit softer and the crack has a rounded feel. awesome lead james.

PITCH
10
(5.9, 130')
   this photo is taken looking up towards the top of eagle wall from the top of pitch 9. one more pitch will bring you to the top of eagle wall. but because there are no fixed anchors after the top of pitch 9, most parties do not climb the 10th pitch and they rap the route from the top of pitch 9. we toyed with the idea of climbing the 10th pitch so that we could officially top out, but this would mean a much longer and unknown descent, so we gave in to temptation of a quick descent and getting back to the car before dinnertime....the rappels took us about an hour and we were back to the car before 5pm.

by the way, the handren guide calls for a "single rack to 2 inches" but we followed mountainproject beta and did not bring a #2 cam. we never needed it. perhaps it is needed for pitch 10?

DESCENT
       this photo shows james making the final rappel to the base of the wall, from an anchor in the middle of the face just left of pitches and 2. it took us just under 1 hour to rappel the route. we made 9 rappels with a single 70m as follows:
1. Top of Pitch 9
2. Top of Pitch 8
3. Top of Pitch 7
4. Top of Pitch 5
5. Top of Pitch 4
6. Top of Pitch 3
7. Halfway up Pitch 3
8. Top of Pitch 2
9. Middle of the face just left of Pitches 1 and 2

OTHER PHOTOS FROM THE DAY
                     there was a conga line up levitation 29 that day. we were the only party on eagle dance.


CLIMB 6 - MAR 24 - w/ JAMES HUANG & MAIA BAEGENT
Tunnel Vision (5.7+, 6 pitches, 750')
on Angel Food Wall in White Rock Springs  
Tunnel Vision follows a unique natural line of featured chimneys and groves, and is perhaps best known for it's 80-foot tunnel on the fifth pitch. Due to its moderate grade and fun and unique climbing, Tunnel Vision is one of the more popular routes at Red Rocks.
FA: Joe Herbst & Randal Grandstaff, 1974

Route overlay:
(Pitches as per Handren guide) Photos: Notes:

PITCH

1
(5.7+, 110')
             the crux of pitch 1 is a hand traverse just 15 feet off the ground. it's tempting to set pro in the corner, but this would result in a lot of rope drag once the leader turns the corner and heads up the crack system.

PITCH
2
(5.5, 100')
      the first photo shows maia leading off pitch 2. the second photo shows james and maia at the belay at the top of pitch 2. this is the only bolted belay station on the route, likely because there is really no good place to set gear anywhere nearby.

PITCH
3
(5.7+, 120')
            the looming slot of pitch 3 and obnoxious pee puddles at the belay ledge at the top of pitch 3.

PITCH
4
(5.5, 120')
         pitch 4 pulls a juggy roof and ends at the entrance to the tunnel.

PITCH
5
(5.6, 150')
               pitch 5 climbs through the tunnel, which is formed by a giant flake feature. not much pro in the tunnel but it is fairly easy chimnying. i had planned on leading this pitch and the last, but i had gotten pretty bad food poisoning the night before and was still feeling quite nauseous and chimnying wasn't helping....

PITCH
6
(5.7, 150')
  pitch 6 to the top.

DESCENT
     the descent scrambles down a 3rd class gully to climbers' left of the climb.

OTHER PHOTOS FROM CLIMB
    the view of vegas from the top of tunnel vision.


CLIMBS 7&8 - MAR 25 - w/ JAMES HUANG & NICK WEICHT
Ixtlan (5.11c, 8 pitches, 665'
on Whiskey Peak in Black Velvet Canyon
For any climber walking into Black Velvet Canyon, its hard not to notice the impressive lightening-bolt crack system splitting down the face of the middle buttress of Whiskey Peak, gleaming in the morning sun. The route that ascends this crack and goes all the way to the top of the buttress is called Ixtlan. The crux climbing of the route is getting to the crack, which starts 70' above the ground. This is an awesome climb—if I had to name a favorite climb from the trip, this would be it.
FA: Jorge & Joanne Urioste, Dan Goodwin, 1981.

and The Gobbler (5.9, 2 pitches, 200') to Fiddler on the Roof (5.10d, 5 pitches, 620'
on Black Velvet Wall in Black Velvet Canyon
The Gobbler offers two to three pitches of good climbing stiff at its grade up face and crack, most often used as an approach to Dream of Wild Turkeys or Fiddler on the Roof. We chose the latterFiddler on the Roof is an exciting route that starts from the second anchor of The Gobbler and traverse out right above the lib of the huge arch (beware if you slip, you might need your prussiks...), and finishes by climbing the towering wall above. This is another awesome climb.
FA (The Gobbler): Jorge & Joanne Urioste, 1980; FA (Fiddler on the Roof): Dave Wonderly, Warren Egbert, Jennifer Richards, 1990.
Route overlay:
Notes:
  • Ixtlan: History or Route and Origin of route nameIxtlan was established by the Uriostes and Dan Goodwin in 1981. The first pitch required bolting (5.11c), but the FAer’s went on to bolt much of the third and fourth pitches as well, since these portions of the route require large cams that were not available at the time. (Due to the fact that these pitches can be protected with #6 cams, any bolts above the first pitch are from the FAer's, and are more and more suspect as time goes on.) My guess is that this route was named in reference to Journey to Ixtlan by Carlos Castaneda; in this book he explores the teachings of Don Juan, and "Ixtlan" is a metaphorical hometown to which one is compelled to return. Sort of like how once I saw the lightening bolt crack of Ixtlan splitting the face of Whiskey Peak I was compelled to someday return to climb this route.
  • The Gobbler: History or Route and Origin of route name: This is another Urioste route, established in 1980. It's my guess that the route name comes from the fact that this route is below the route Dream of Wild Turkeys, sort of forming "the gobbler" (in actual fact, the route Dream of Wild Turkeys refers not to actual literal turkeys, but it is a commentary on the heated controversy at the time over adding bolts to routes, when the Uriostes were called "turkeys" for their next-generation style of adding bolts to unprotectable sections of climbs). 
  • Fiddler on the Roof: History or Route and Origin of route name: This is one of the younger routes on Black Velvet Wall, established by Dave Wonderly, Warren Egbert, and Jennifer Richards in 1990. The route is likely named for the large roof the route traverses over.
(Pitches as per Handren guide) Photos: Notes:
IXTLAN
PITCH

1
(5.11c, 70')

(PITCHES 1-3 can be linked)
               the 11c grade of the first pitch keeps most climbers off of this route, even though the pitch is fairly well-bolted. but nick weicht had joined james and me for the day of climbing, and had the confidence to give the first pitch a try. all three of us struggled on the crux (about halfway up) but other than that the climbing was doable albeit challenging.

nick did an amazing job leading this pitch, and linked it in with pitches 2 and 3 for an amazing 200-ft lead to a nice ledge above the roof. a ledge beats a hanging belay any day.
IXTLAN
PITCH
2
(5.10a, 60')

(PITCHES 1-3 can be linked)
                  pitch 2 climbs the lightening bolt flake that is so obvious from the ground. with its 10a climbing, this pitch is just pure fun. it was my favorite pitch of the route.
IXTLAN
PITCH
3
(5.10d, 60')

(PITCHES 1-3 can be linked)
                pitch 3 is a splitter offwidth. there are no features on the sides for the feet, so the offwidth is quite burly. the offwidth has a few protection bolts from the original ascent, but it could be protected by a #6 cam as well (we used the 35-year-old bolts). the pitch finishes by pulling the roof (not hard, there's some features) and ending on a nice belay ledge. it's the first comfortable belay spot on the route, so if you have the stamina it's a good idea to link the first three pitches.
IXTLAN
PITCH
4
(5.9, 80')

(PITCHES 4-6 can be linked)
      to avoid an awkward belay inside a chimney, it's a good idea to link pitches 4-6, which are all very short.
IXTLAN
PITCH
5
(5.8, 80')

(PITCHES 4-6 can be linked)
  lots of features.
IXTLAN
PITCH
6
(5.5, 30')

(PITCHES 4-6 can be linked)
      the short traverse of pitch 6. this is best linked with pitches 4-5 rather than 7 to avoid creating rope drag on pitch 7.
IXTLAN
PITCH
7
(5.9+, 120')
     fun crack.
IXTLAN
PITCH
8
(5.10a, 165')
                 the final pitch up some interesting easy corners. the climbing seemed more like 5.8 than 10a.
THE GOBBLER
PITCH
1
(5.9, 120')

(PITCHES 1-2 can be linked)
       to get to fiddler on the roof, you must climb the first two pitches with the gobbler. nick led these two pitches as a single rope-stretching 200-ft pitch. the climbing was stiff for the grade.
THE GOBBLER
PITCH
2
(5.9, 90')

(PITCHES 1-2 can be linked)
          pitch 2 of the gobbler. very cool climbing.
FIDDLER ON THE ROOF
PITCH
1
(5.10c, 100')
      the wild traverse above the roof. this pitch is rated 10c, but its a very heady pitch as if you slip you will end up dangling below the roof in mid air. bring your prusiks!
FIDDLER ON THE ROOF
PITCH
2
(5.10d, 150')
        the technical crux of the route is the second pitch. it has four bolts in 150', but there are occasional opportunities for small nuts and cams. it's a bit hard to make out the holds from below, but they are there....
FIDDLER ON THE ROOF
PITCHES
3-5
(5.10b, 5.10b, 5.9+, 150', 100', 100')
    james at the top of the crux pitch (nice lead james!). there are three more pitches in the route, but we had run out of time for any more climbing and i had an early flight out the next morning, and had done the highlight pitches of the route, so we descended from here.