<-- Map of summer 2016
     climbing roadtrip 
     (click to enlarge)
AUG 
25-30
2016

DEEP LAKE: 
Climb 1: LOST TEMPLE SPIRE SW Arete (5.10b, ~9p)
Climb 2: STEEPLE PEAK North Ridge (5.9, ~5p)
Climb 3: HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN Southern Wall Left (5.10c, ~9p)
Climb 4: HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN Minor Dihedral (5.9, ~8p)
Climb 5: HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN Central Corner (5.9, ~5p)

Category: Wyoming      Trip Report #: 232
Partner: Jeff Lodas
Rock Type: Granite
Summit Elev: ~12,000 ft

Five 5.9-5.10 area classics in five days.

Climbs we did:


INTRO

Location/Approach image 
En route to the Cirque of the Towers, climbers hike along the western shore Big Sandy Lake, and continue northwards up to Jackass Pass and into the Cirque. Many don't even notice that trail that branches off to the right, heading up into the valley to the east of Big Sandy Lake. This valley houses Deep and Clear Lakes. Above these lakes rise Haystack Mountain's mile-wide slabs, sharp-peaked Steeple Peak, East Temple's vertical northwest face, and its detached prow, the Lost Temple Spire. The climbing potential of this area was first realized in 1961, when a group that included Fred Beckey, Yvon Chouinard, Art Gran, John Hudson, and Bruce Monroe camped at Deep Lake and made the first ascents of Haystack, Steeple, Lost Temple Spire, East Temple's northwest face, and Temple's north face. The rock was reportedly stellar, the camping pleasant, the scenery spectacular. Nevertheless, hiding in the shadows of the nearby Cirque of the Towers (which had been climbed in for about 20 years before the climbing potential of Deep Lake was realized), Deep Lake has remained an uncrowded gem of a climbing area.

After three trips to the Cirque, and intriguing glimpses of the Deep Lake area to the southeast, I was compelled to plan a climbing trip into the Deep Lake area. So the last week of August 2016, my friend Jeff Lodas and I headed into Deep Lake for a week. Since this was my first time in the area, I was interested in climbing the "area classics" and climbing to all of the major summits. Over the course of five days, we climbed climbed five popular 5.9-5.10 routes, one on each major feature. I was highly impressed with the quality and variety of the climbing. The climbing was challenging and interesting for the grade, and the routes long enough to make for full day adventures. Our camp at the head of Deep Lake was spectacular. And three out of the five days, we never encountered another soul. This trip was a great introduction to the area. Jeff and I we will both certainly be back. Already we have our eyes on several other (harder) area classics and even some potentially new lines....

The following page gives a trip report for our five days of climbing in Deep Lake. Thanks Jeff for being an awesome partner!


Aug 25 - Hike in, establish camp at upper end of Deep Lake.
Photos:
1.   
2.   
3.   
4.   
5.   
6.   
7.   
8.   
9.   
10.   
Photo Descriptions:
1.
Getting to the Big Sandy Opening trailhead entails a couple of hours of driving along well-graded dirt roads.
2. Starting the hike. 6 easy miles to Big Sandy Lake, then just a couple of more miles into the Deep Lake Valley.
3. Hiking around the right (east) side of Big Sandy Lake (you can either leave the main trail at the south or north end of the lake, but it is shorter to leave the trail at the south end of the lake and take a path around the east side).
4. Sign marking the trail to Clear Lake. This is a good trail.  The trail actually continues up and over Temple Pass so it receives a lot of thru traffic as well.
5. Haystack rising above Clear Lake. This is about an hour (or less) from the turnoff at Big Sandy Lake.
6. On the slabs between Clear Lake and Deep Lake. Warbonnet in background. 
7. View from the north end of Deep Lake, looking towards Steeple Peak and Lost Temple Spire / East Temple Peak at the head of the valley. There are plenty of options for camping here.
8. We camped at the head of the valley at the south end of Deep Lake. 
9. This photo is taken looking north from camp. Evening light on the Southern Wall of Haystack.
10. This photo is taken looking south from camp. Evening light on Steeple Peak and Lost Temple Spire / East Temple.

Note about camping: 
Climbers have the option of camping at Clear Lake (lower and closer, sheltered in the trees, right below Haystack), Deep Lake (higher and further, more open views, right below Steeple and Lost Temple), or the slabs between (good compromise). We chose to camp at the head of the valley at the far end of Deep Lake, and were rewarded with awesome views and quiet camping (had the place to ourselves).


Aug 26 - Climb SW Arete of Lost Temple Spire. Get caught in a snow storm on the crux pitch. Continue climbing but forgo the final scramble to touch the summit.
LOST TEMPLE SPIRE (12,480')
Southwest Arete (5.10b, ~9p)
This inconspicuous climb is tucked around the corner of Lost Temple Spire near where the spire meets the huge northwest face of East Temple. The climb takes beautiful clean corners up the prow of this spire, with unmatched position and aesthetic movement. 
Route Overlay:  (Pitches in this trip report as per Bechtel guide.)
Photos:  Photo descriptions: 
Approach 
3rd class grassy ledges from basin below
1.   
2.   
   

   
   
 
   
   
1. Hiking past a small lake above Deep Lake on the approach to the base of the route.
2. One of the 3rd class ledges you take to access the base of the route (on the approach, move right across this ledge, then back left to get to the base of the route). In this photo, Deep Lake below; Southern Wall of Haystack along ridgeline to north; Cirque of the Towers in far distance.
Pitch 
1
5.7
3.    
3. Looking up Pitch 1, which starts at a black dike. There are two ways to start this pitch, shown in the photo. Either climb directly up via a difficult groove (as the first ascent party did) or surmount the easier overhang/chockstone to the right. Then climb up and left towards the crest.
Pitch 
2
5.10a
4.   
5.   
       
4. This pitch starts by ascending the acute right-leaning corner.
5. A challenging overlap on Pitch 2.
Pitch 
3
5.8
6. 6. Climb a fist and hand crack to the right of the corner to a broken area above.
Pitch 
4
5.9
7.    
7. Climb up to ledge with a block rapped in rappel slings (you can see the block in the photo); from there climb either straight up or up the nice corner to the right (we went up the nice corner to the right).
Pitch 
5
5.10a
8.    
8. This pitch ascends a challenging yet awesome 70-ft fingercrack in a right-facing corner and ends at a nice sloping ledge.
Pitch 
6
5.10b
(crux pitch)

9.   
10.   
11.   
12.   
13.   
       
9. Jeff looking up at the crux pitch from the ledge below. We ended up deciding to move the belay to where he is in the photo.
10. Jeff starting up the crux pitch. The Bechtel guide has a photo of a climber on this pitch taken from the exact same location.
11. Looking up at Pitch 6, which climbs a thin crack to just below the roofs, then moves right and up to a belay stance. As you can see in the photo, it started to snow on us when Jeff was midway up this pitch (perfect timing huh?!). We had to stop and wait it out for about 15 minutes until the storm passed. Jeff has actually lowered down and is hanging out below a roof.
12. That storm moved in quick!
13. At least it was hail and not rain (both us and the rock didn't get as wet as we would have if it was rain).
Pitch 
7
5.9
14.   
14. Because of the weather situation, Jeff decided to link Pitch 7 with Pitch 6 once we started climbing again. Pitch 7 is a short (~50 foot) traverse rightward to a small ledge and to the base of a big chimney. Jeff is at the belay at the end of Pitch 7 in the photo and I am just about to start climbing Pitch 6.
Pitch 
8
5.7
15.   
16.    
15. The deep chimney. There was some protection but it seemed a bit runnout (the recent hail storm did not help, as it had made both the rock and us pretty cold and a bit moist).
16. The upper half of the chimney, above a giant chockstone in the chimney. 
Pitch 
9
3rd
Above the chimney is easier going and a scramble to the summit. We did not do the final scramble to the top due to weather and our desire to get down before the next wave of the storm hit.      

Summit 

No photos. Although we were just about 100 feet below the top when we began the descent and had essentially completed the route, I felt a sense of incompleteness about this route simply because we did not touch the summit. Oh well, I guess it gives even more reason to come back and climb this spire again again....I have my eye on Separation Anxiety (11a) up the prow...

Descent 
Rappel the route from fixed rap stations (single 70m rope).
17.   
18.   
19.   
20. 
17. Rappelling from a slung block in the upper chimney. These blocks look pretty precariously-wedged but unless you have double ropes to bypass this rappel station, it's the only option.
18. A second wave of the storm hit during the rappels.
19. Rappelling.
20. One of the rap anchors. Cam and sling for backup for the first person down.


Aug 27 - Climb North Ridge of Steeple Peak.
STEEPLE PEAK (12,030')
North Ridge (5.9, ~5p)
Steeple is a beautiful mountain dwarfed by the massive walls of Haystack and East Temple. The North Ridge of Steeple is one of the most popular routes in the area, featuring interesting climbing at a moderate grade with a spectacular position. The route ascends rock west of the crest to the north ridge's broad shoulder, disappears into the chimney above, tunnels through the mountain, and emerges beneath a splitter corner pitch which takes you to the summit.
Route Overlay:  (Pitches in this trip report as per Bechtel guide.)
Photos:  Photo descriptions: 
Approach 
3rd class grassy ledges from basin below
1.   
2.   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
1. Approaching the North Ridge from Deep Lake. There are lots of 3rd class ledges and multiple variations to getting to the base of the route by going up these ledges.
2. At the base of the north ridge is a memorial plaque for Ryan Sayers, who was hit by lightning while climbing this route in 2003. Based on the plaque, I think he liked math (although I am still trying to figure out the meanings of the fractions on the plaque).
Pitch 
1
5.8
3.   
4.    
3. The roped climbing begins at the base of a crack that extends 140 feet up the ridge's west side to the shoulder above. I started the pitch here, although I think you can scramble up a bit higher from the left and start at the crack shown the next photo.
4. This is the official start of Pitch 1. You can start up either crack. The left start is 5.9 and the corner on the right is 5.8. I went left.
Pitch 
2
5.8
5.    
5. From a belay on the shoulder, ascend a trough on the ridge's west side to a pair of cracks that lead up the shoulder of the ridge again.
Pitch 
3
5.7
6.   
7.   
8.
6. The Great North Chimney on the upper north ridge of Steeple. From the top of Pitch 2, scramble about 300 feet of 3rd class to the base of the chimney at the start of Pitch 3.
7. Looking up from the base of the chimney. (I chose the direct option to access the chimney via a dihedral from below rather than ascending cracks from the right).
8. Jeff chimneying to the chockstone belay. Only the last 10 feet or so of this pitch involve any chimneying.
Pitch 
4
5.6
9.   
10.   
11.    
9. This pitch tunnels through the chimney 40-50 feet and then heads up about 20 feet to a break in the ceiling and a ledge.
10. Looking up from the end of the tunneling section.
11. The ledge at the top of Pitch 4.
Pitch 
5
5.9 (or 4th)
12.   
13.   
14.    
12. The easier (4th) finish to the route is to climb under this flake to the north, around and onto the top of it, and up to the summit plateau. 
13. The harder (5.9) but better option is to climb cracks in the summit block right of the leaning flake. 
14. Jeff on the corner pitch to the top. This is an excellent way to finish the route. Highly recommended over the 4th class option.
Summit 
Awesome views.
15.   
16.   
17.   
18.    
15. View to the south. Lost Temple Spire / East Temple as seen from Steeple Peak. 
16. View to the east. "Little El Capitan" (center) and Wind River Peak (on right).
17. View to the north. Ridgeline extending towards Southern Wall of Haystack. Cirque of the Towers in distance. Deep Lake below.
18. Lake in the basin below to the east. Looks like a sitting cat or a howling wolf or something.
Descent 
South Ridge (3-4 single-rope raps, 3rd class scramble)
19. 
19. The descent is down the south ridge. I think we did 3 short rappels and scrambling to the Steeple-Lost Temple Spire col, and from there 3rd class scrambling down ledges back to Deep Lake.


Aug 28 - Climb Southern Wall Left on the right flank of Haystack Mountain.
HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN (11,978')
Southern Wall Left (5.10c, ~9p)
The southern wall of Haystack’s west face is a beautiful clean dome that sits above the north end of Deep Lake. This route ascends this face, offering 1000' of exposed and continuous climbing on good rock. Lots of slabby corners and a challenging crux pitch. Heady climbing with old-school ratings.
Route Overlay:  (Pitches in this trip report as per Bechtel guide.)
Photos:  Photo descriptions: 
Approach 
Scramble to high point below large gully, then scramble up to ledge with red stone above.
1.   
2.   
   
   
  
   
  
  

1. The route starts at a high point of the slopes, right of a large-left-leaning gully. The roped climbing starts about 100 feet up at an arching, vegetated ledge with red stone above it (right-center in photo).
2. The view from the base of the route, looking down at Deep Lake. Temple Peak lit in the morning sun.
Pitch 
1
5.4
3.   
4.    
3. The start of Pitch 1, about 100 feet up at an arching, vegetated ledge with red stone above it.
4. Traverse right and up from ledge to another ledge (where Jeff is in the photo). This pitch goes more rightward than we had initially thought, so we initially went a bit too high and had to do a slightly more spooky traverse than anticipated. Best to go pretty much horizontally right to below the ledge and then directly up. The route-finding can be devious on the lower pitches of this route. I think this is because the correct way sometimes looks more improbable than it actually is.
Pitch 
2
5.6
5.   
6.    
5. This pitch supposedly climbs the flake above Jeff which arches right and then takes a slab traverse into the left-facing corners. The slab traverse looked improbable, so Jeff decided to go up the flake/corner up and left of him in the photo and traverse to the right higher...
6. The higher option involved a undercling to the belay. This was definitely not 5.6 but was good climbing.
Pitch 
3
5.7
7.  7. This pitch follows the corner system up to a ledge. The corners on the route are slabby corners, which involve trusting foot smears rather than jamming.
Pitch 
4
5.7
8.    
8. The goal of this pitch is to get below the giant open book in upper left-center of the photo. The correct corner to take is the one on the left in this photo. We debated and went right since it looked easy, and ended up traversing left at the top (easy but runnout) to get to the belay. At times, the route-finding can be a bit devious on the lower pitches of this route. 
Pitch 
5
5.8
9.   
10.   
11.     
9. This pitch climbs the groove feature. There are some thought-provoking sections and tenuous steps first to the left and then back to the right. The climbing is pretty sustained 5.8 with some no-fall moves above gear.
10. Looking down the pitch. I had not really liked the route up until this point, but I thought that the climbing on this pitch (and all pitches above this pitch) was great.
11. Jeff climbing the pitch.
Pitch 
6
5.10c
(crux pitch)
12.   
13.      
12. In the photo Jeff is at the small bulge that enters the right-facing corner. This is the first cruxy section of the pitch, but is protectable and more of a powerful move than difficult.
13. This is the second cruxy section of the pitch, up a thin crack with mediocre protection. This crux is more mental and tenuous than the first. Nice lead Jeff!
Pitch 
7
5.9
14.   
15.   
    
14. This pitch climbs a splitter finger crack through the small overhang on the right.
15. The end of this pitch is a traverse on a downward-sloping ledge to the base of the next pitch.
Pitch 
8
5.9
16.   
17.   
18.   
19.   
20.   
21.   
   
   
      
16. There are a couple of options for how to start this pitch and access the dihedral that makes up the second half of the pitch. We started at this crack off the ledge, but apparently there is a lower crack (lower down the ledge) that might provide a more direct access to the dihedral above. Because we started at the location shown in the photo, we decided to break the pitch into two leads; Jeff set an intermediate belay at the base of the dihedral. I'd say that no matter where you start this pitch, it might be a good idea to break this pitch into two leads, since the dihedral is quite gear-intensive and the pitch ends with a traverse so minimizing rope drag low on the pitch is ideal.
17. Looking up the dihedral. This was one of my favorite pitches of the route.
18. A view of climbers on the dihedral, taken the previous afternoon.
19. Looking down from the top of the dihedral, just before the knobby face.
20. The knobby face. Ascend the knobs to the ceiling, do a hand traverse left at the ceiling, and then traverse left some more to a belay spot.
21. The final traverse at the end of the pitch.
Pitch 
9
4th
22.     
22. The route ends by traversing this diagonal weakness across the face to the summit ridge.
"Summit"
High point on the south end of the long ridge of Haystack.
23.   
24.    
23. On the summit ridge. The high point of Southern Wall is on the right.
24. Jeff on the summit ride. Steeple and Lost Temple Spire / East Temple Peak in distance.
Descent 
Hike along ridge to Grassy Goat Trail. see photos from climb of Minor Dihedral


Aug 29 - Climb Minor Dihedral on Haystack Mountain.
HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN (11,978')
Minor Dihedral (5.9, ~8p)
Minor Dihedral is one of the most popular climbs outside the Cirque. This climb is wonderfully consistent in both quality and difficulty and follows clean cracks and corners, including a long pitch up one of two huge dihedrals on the mountain.
Route Overlay:  (Pitches in this trip report as per Bechtel guide. It has become standard for climbers to begin the route at the start of the original fourth pitch by traversing in from the high grass on the right; like the Bechtel guide, I will call Pitch 1 the pitch that starts from this high traverse, i.e., the original fourth pitch of the route.)
Photos:  Photo descriptions: 
Approach 
Standard start: scramble to high grass right of the start of the original 4th pitch and make an easy slab traverse.
1.   
   
   
   
 
 
1. Approaching Haystack from the Deep Lake direction. (Many parties who climb Haystack just camp at Clear Lake or low on the slabs between the lake, so in this case the approach would be more from below than above.)
Pitch 
1
(Pitch 4 of original route...)
5.9
(crux pitch)
2.    
2. Climbers on Pitch 1 (John and Karl from Casper, WY, who also climbed alongside us the next day). This pitch ascends a 130-foot right-facing corner, whose crux is an 8-foot discontinuity passed by delicate footwork. In the photo Karl is at the crux of the route. I was able to get in a bomber cam (I think it was the metolius equivalent of a #1 BD) about a body-length below the crux, and a marginal black alien just a bit higher than this. The distance above the last piece of gear makes this crux both a mental and technical crux.
Pitch
2
5.8
3.   
4.    
3. The easy slab traverse at the beginning of Pitch 2.
4. The left-sloping ramp of the second half of Pitch 2. I think Jeff is belaying a bit below the standard end of this pitch, which according to route descriptions is a "big ledge above a short overhanging corner" (see Photo 5 below).
Pitch 
3
5.6
5. 5. The third pitch starts with a tricky slabby traverse right into a scoop. In this photo, the climber is in the scoop. According to the Kelsey topo, the standard belay would be at the ledge to the left of the scoop, which makes the traverse slightly down and right from the belay. But it is also possible the belay might be lower and that the traverse is more up and right. The traverse seemed harder than 5.6, partly because the leader faces a swing back into the corner. It is possible to set a cam high after the traverse to prevent the follower from facing too large of a swing. After the tricky traverse to the scoop, the pitch finishes easily up broken rock.
Pitch 
4
5.8
6.   
7.      
6. This pitch starts off my ascending a left-facing corner to a ceiling.
7. Above the ceiling is a nice crack to a ledge below the upper dihedral.
Pitch 
5
5.9
8.   
9.   
 
  
    
8. This is the money pitch of the route, ascending the large dihedral. It is a long pitch, about 180-200 feet depending on where you put the final belay (a couple of ledges to choose from).
9. Looking down while leading the dihedral pitch.
Pitch 
6
5.8
10.   
11.       
10. Continue up the crack and corner system.
11. Climbing near the top of the pitch.
Pitch 
7
"4th"
12.   
13.   
   
    
12. We decided to unrope at the top of Pitch 6, since from here it is apparently 4th class. Clear Lake below.
13. Some moves seemed more like low-5th to me, even though the route description says "4th". I would say most parties would want to stay roped up for at least 100 feet after the end of Pitch 6.
Pitch 
8
4th
14.    
14. It becomes more standard 4th class closer to the top. Most parties would be okay unroping here.
Summit 

15.    
15. Jeff on a subsummit of Haystack, looking towards the Cirque of the Towers in the distance.
Descent 
Grassy Goat Trail
16.   
17. 
18.   
19.   
20.   
16. Starting down the Grassy Goat Trail. This is mostly 3rd class, with a couple of 4th class steps.
17. On one of the short 4th class steps.
18. 
Marmot guarding an (optional) rap station on the Grassy Goat Trail. Temple Peak behind.
19. That's one fat marmot, getting ready for the winter hibernation.
20. Zoomed in on the two distinct dihedrals on Haystack. The Major Dihedral route goes up the left dihedral and the Minor Dihedral route goes up the right dihedral. The dihedral pitch of either route is 5.9 climbing.


Aug 30 - Pack up camp. Climb Central Corner on the right flank of Haystack Mountain on the way out. Hike out.
HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN (11,978')
Central Corner (5.9, ~5p)
Just right of the Great Chimney is a beautiful right-facing corner that extends nearly the height of the face. This route ascends this corner, offering excellent and clean climbing with a sustained difficulty level for most of the climb.
Route Overlay:  (Pitches in this trip report as per Bechtel guide.)
Photos:  Photo descriptions: 
Approach 
Easy scramble up grassy slopes to base of whatever start you chose to access corner. no photos
Pitch 
1
4th-5.2
1.   
2.   
1-2. There are a couple of ways to access the corner. One is to climb a 5.2 ramp system on the left below the corner and the other way is to climb up the first pitch of the Great Chimney route. We chose to climb the first pitch of the Great Chimney, since this is a unique feature that forms a giant rut up the mountain. The climbing on Pitch 1 is 4th class on relatively solid rock. It is low-angled enough that the climbing is more just climbing steppy rock on the back of the chimney/rut than doing any actual chimneying. It is about a 300 foot pitch from the base of the chimney to the base of the corner, so we did some simulclimbing in order to do it as one pitch.
Pitch 
2
5.9
(crux pitch)
3.   
4.   
3. At the base of the awesome corner. There was a party ahead of us (John and Karl from Casper, WY). The crux of the route is just above the climber (Karl) in the photo; this a short power layback section getting over the roof. There is a good belay stance about 30 feet above the roof.
4. Jeff following the first corner pitch.
Pitch 
3
5.9
5.   
5. Looking up the second corner pitch. Just more fun and sustained 5.8-5.9 climbing.
Pitch 
4
5.8
6.   
6. Looking up Pitch 4, an arching right-facing corner. This grassy area is the best belay spot and the one alluded to in most route descriptions. We had belayed about 20 feet too early. 
Pitch 
5
5.6
7.   
8.   
7. The entrance to the chimney system on the final pitch. It is possible to access the chimney by climbing this corner/face or by going up a ramp to the left.
8. Looking up the chimney. Pretty easy climbing. 
"Summit"
Route ends on the long ridge of Haystack.
9.   
10.   
11.   
9. At the top of the route, a short 3rd class scramble to the summit ridge.
10. On the long summit ridge of Haystack. The route tops out more on a high ridge of the Haystack massive than on a specific summit itself. Clear Lake below and the Cirque of the Towers in the distance. The entrance to the Grassy Goat trail is down the slope in the photo.
11. Zoomed in on the Cirque of the Towers to the north. Left to right: Warbonnet, Shark's Nose, Overhanging Tower, Wolf's Head, Bollinger Peak, Pingora.
Descent 
Grassy Goat Trail
see photos from climb of Minor Dihedral 




Other photos - Below are some photos I took when we were not climbing. Most of these photos were taken from or near our camp at the head of the Deep Lake valley. It's certainly a beautiful and comfortable place to be.
Photos:
1.   
2.   
3.   
4.   
5.   
6.   
7.   
8.   
9.   
10.   
11.   
12.   
13.   
14.   
15.   
16.   
17.   
18.   
19.   
20.   
Photo Descriptions:
1. Morning sun cresting over the north ridge of Steeple Peak. This photo was taken at 8:40am, which is around the time the sun hits the north end of Deep Lake in late August (a couple of hours after sunrise).
2-5. Morning sun on the Cirque of the Towers, as seen looking northward over Deep Lake.
6. An afternoon storm hitting the Cirque. The weather is typically a tad better at Deep Lake, and more than once we had clear skies while clouds were building around the Cirque.
7. Evening colors over the Cirque.
8-11. Steeple Peak and Lost Temple Spire / East Temple as seen from the north end of Deep Lake. We camped at the south end.
12. Close up on the north ridges of Steeple and Lost Temple Spire. The North Ridge of Steeple (which we climbed) is a well-deserved area classic. A route called Separation Anxiety (11a) ascends the north prow of Lost Temple; I definitely want to come back and climb this route.
13-15. Evening alpenglow on Steeple and Lost Temple Spire / East Temple Peak.
16. Evening light on the Southern Wall of Haystack as seen from the head of the valley looking across Deep Lake. The Cirque of the Towers is in the distance on the left side of the photo.
17. A bit pinker.
18. Steeple and Lost Temple Spire / East Temple silouetted against the morning sky.
19. This photo was taken on an afternoon ramble up the valley a bit above Deep Lake.
20. This photo was taken on an evening ramble up to the basin below Temple Peak. A trail leads along the west side of Deep Lake and eventually goes to Temple Pass, to the left of Temple Peak in the photo. There are some climbing routes on Temple, but they are not (yet) as popular as the climbs closer to Deep Lake.